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Out of the Cold: Gardening Indoors this Winter

For those of us retreating into our homes this winter, watching the snow fall from inside, there comes a certain longing for the relaxation and satisfaction of getting our hands dirty in the garden. Gardening in a zone four, there is really no chance of me getting outside to my garden until mid May. So, I improvise! Below are a few things that I plant indoors to not only add flavor to my favorite winter dishes, but bring some beautiful color indoors during the dreary, winter months.

Planting Herbs Indoors

Herb - Chives

Chives

There are quite a few herbs that can be planted inside on the windowsill for fast, delicious results. I love the instant gratification of sprouts in just a week or so! This winter, try growing Basil, Cilantro, Parsley, Thyme, Sage, Chives, or Catnip for delicious winter results! Having an indoor herb garden is a fantastic way to keep the gardening spirit alive in the winter months.

Planting Bulbs Indoors

There are several different types of bulbs that can be planted indoors for immediate growth and blooms. I like to plant Amaryllis, Hyacinths, and Paperwhites to bring a variety of color indoors in the winter. Make it easy with any of our growing kits that come with everything you need to plant –a decorative pot, planting soil, and a top-quality bulb. You will be ecstatic when you have an array of beautiful blooms in just a few months!

Forcing Bulbs Indoors

Daffodil - Tete a Tete

Tete-a-Tete Daffodils

For those of us who love the display of Tulips, Daffodils, and Hyacinths, and just can’t wait until spring, try pre-chilling bulbs and forcing them to grow inside. Pre-chill the bulbs for a minimum of eight to ten weeks in a refrigerator at a temperature of around 40°F to 45°F (the temperature of most home refrigerators). If you use a refrigerator, be sure not to store any apples or other fruits alongside your bulbs. Ripening fruit naturally gives off ethylene gas which will kill the flower inside the bulbs.

Once the bulbs are chilled, you can take them out of the refrigerator and plant them in pots. Make sure they have plenty of sunlight and you will be pleased with the delightful display of spring inside before your garden thaws out!

As always, Happy Gardening!

November 29, 2011 · Amanda Shepard · Comments Closed
Tags: , , , , , , ,  · Posted in: Flower Bulbs, Gardening in Fall, Gardening in the Winter, How-Tos, Vegetable Seeds