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Protect Your Bulbs!

Although squirrel and gopher watching may be a fun pastime for you and your family, their tendency to snack on freshly-planted Tulips, Crocus, and Hyacinths is not so amusing. Don’t let this discourage you from planting these gorgeous spring-bloomers; With a few simple steps you can keep hungry critters away and enjoy the fruits of your labor come spring!

Many gardeners will spread a natural critter repellant on top of the soil after planting their bulbs, such as our Organic Shake Away product. Most repellants are made up of natural ingredients (e.g. fox urine) that tend to deter small critters. We recommend applying immediately after planting and once more after the ground freezes.

Another method to deterring small animals from eating your bulbs is shielding your bulbs with a bulb cage. These can be found at most garden centers and keep your bulbs safe beneath the ground. A more economical option for larger plantings is to line your area with chicken wire, which works the same way as the cage. You can also cover the surface of your garden bed with thorny branches from trimming your roses or perennials down.

Although these methods are fairly simple and effective for protecting bulbs such as Tulips, Hyacinths and Crocus, if you don’t have the resources or time to “critter-proof” your bulb beds, try planting Daffodils and Snowdrop Bulbs. These bulbs are naturally unattractive to critters because they contain natural toxins that are bitter to the taste.

Now you can plant, sit back and relax without worrying about critters snacking on your precious bulbs. Happy Gardening!


October 18, 2012 · Amanda Shepard · 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , ,  · Posted in: Flower Bulbs, Gardening in Fall, How-Tos

2 Responses

  1. Yvonne Ruprecht - October 21, 2012

    I planted 200 bulbs, (that I bought from you) they came up absolutely beautiful and then last year we had abou 12 flowers and lots of very lush greenery? I want to plant another 100 this year but am a little aprehensive as the garden looked a mess as I had to wait a couple of months for the foliage to die which inerfered with my beatiful summer garden (it was very messy do you have any idea why the bulbs did not bloom? and can I expect them to bloom next spring?

    Any suggestiond would be very welcvome, before I order and plant another 100 bulbs.

    Thank you,
    Yvonne Ruprecht
    617-523-3253

  2. Amanda Shepard - October 22, 2012

    Hi Yvonne – Thank you for your questions! The fact that you had foliage but not many blooms means that the bulbs may have been planted too deep. There is also a good chance that because last winter was so mild, the bulbs did not get a sufficient cold dormant period, causing them just to grow foliage, but not flower. The bulb will try to retain as much energy as possible, so they may not bloom. Although Tulips are not always perennial, if this winter is colder you should have blooms next spring. I would recommend planting more bulbs in that area to be sure you experience as much color next spring as possible. Please let me know if you have any other questions. Happy Gardening! – Amanda