American Meadows

Welcome to American Meadows!

View
Your Cart

Gardening Questions or Comments?

Call 877-309-7333 or E-mail

Bulb, Rhizome, Tuber… What’s the Difference?

Dahlia TuberThroughout the years, the term “bulb” has come to describe any type of root form that is planted in the ground to produce a plant. However, only a few of these plants are truly “bulbs.” There are four different types: rhizomes, corms, tubers and bulbs. We’ll get the bottom of this misunderstanding and explain exactly what the true difference is between these four terms.

Tuber

Tubers are formed from a stem or root and shoots grow upwards from many different places on the tuber. Examples of tubers are Dahlias, Begonias, Anemones and Potatoes.

Gladiolus CormCorm

Corms are characterized by a dry, flaky outer layer that protects its inner structure. After stems sprout from the corm, buds form on top of the stem. At the end of the growing season, a new corm typically grows on the base of the spent one. Examples of corms are Gladiolus and Crocus.

Rhizome

Rhizomes grow horizontally and form roots from its bottom while shooting out leaves on the top. Buds form at different parts along the structure, not necessarily at the top. Examples of rhizomes are Canna Lilies and Calla Lilies. Calla Lily Rhizome

Bulb

A bulb is comprised of a plant’s stem and leaves. The bottom of the bulb is a compacted stem and roots grow from this part of the bulb. Layers of nutrient-filled leaves sit at the bottom of the bulb and surround a bud that eventually becomes the flower. Examples of bulbs are Tulips, Lilies and Daffodils.

Lily BulbWhether it be a tuber, corm, rhizome or bulb, all of these plant structures are sure to produce an easy, spectacular show in the spring and summer months. Happy Gardening!

 

January 9, 2014 В· Amanda Shepard В· Comments Closed
Tags: , , , , ,  В· Posted in: Gardening in Fall, Gardening in Spring and Summer