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Top 5 Gardening Questions Answered

Wildflower SeedsEach day, we hear from hundreds of gardeners across the country with a variety of planting and general gardening questions. We asked our customer service team to compile the top 5 most-asked customer questions for us to answer. The questions and answers are below. We hope you enjoy (and learn something)!

I like perennials because they come back year after year, but I’m also looking for quick color this season with annuals. What types of Wildflowers should I plant?

This is a common question we get from first-time Wildflower gardeners. Due to this frequent request, we’ve specially formulated dozens of regional and special-use mixtures that contain a variety of annuals and perennials, for blooms in the first season and each year after that. To view all of our mixtures, click here.

WildflowersDo I cover my Wildflower Seeds after I plant?

Many are used to digging a hole, planting their plant or bulb and then covering it with soil. Thus, we always get the question: "Do I cover my Wildflower Seeds after I plant?" The answer is no. Wildflower Seeds need plenty of sun to grow and will not germinate if covered by any soil at all. We recommend simply pressing the seeds down into the soil by walking on them or using a roller (depending on the size of the area) and giving them plenty of water in the beginning stages of growth.

What do I do with my Wildflowers at the end of the season?

In the fall, once all of your Wildflowers have died back and aren’t growing anymore, we recommend mowing them down as you would a grass lawn. This helps for some of the annuals to re-seed naturally and also gives some food for the birds!

Will this grow in my area?

PeonyThis question is typically about Wildflower Seeds but is also asked about Perennial Plants and Bulbs. There are really two parts to answering this question. Before we get into hardiness zones, soil types and water requirements, the most basic way to answer this question is with another question: What is currently growing in the area you want to plant? If there’s something growing in the area, this means your soil is viable and you will be able to grow Wildflowers or other Plants there.

Once this question is answered, there is the matter of hardiness zone, sun requirements, soil type and water accessability. Wildflowers will grow almost anywhere, they just require as much sun as possible and some water in the beginning stages of growth. Perennials and Bulbs, however, have light, zone, and soil requirements. DaylilyYou can find your hardiness zone here and each variety on our site lists its sunlight, soil, and other preferences. To learn how to amend your soil, read our article here.

I got ahead of myself and bought plants and bulbs too early to plant in my area. What do I do with them until I can plant?

If you have perennial or annual plants, keep them lightly watered in a sunny window until it’s time to plant. For bulbs and bareroots, store them in a cool, dark, dry place until it’s time to plant. Wildflower seed can also be stored in a cool, dark, dry place until it’s time to plant.

Do you have a gardening question you want us to answer? Please post in the comments below or write on our Facebook Page. Happy Gardening!

May 1, 2014 В· Amanda Shepard В· 10 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , ,  В· Posted in: Flower Bulbs, Gardening in Spring and Summer, How-Tos, Perennials, Wildflowers

10 Responses

  1. Andrea - May 2, 2014

    I have to know how to grow ranunculus. I love the flower but I live in Louisville KY and it is impossible to grow in my yard. I have lilies, cannas, roses, lavender and they thrive but this flower is giving me a complex!! Help

  2. Frank Leach - May 2, 2014

    When should I cut/mowe my hundreds of grape hyacinths? They have dried and produced numerous pods??? on their stems. My desire is for them to multiply and spread. Thank you.

  3. Beth Hunter - May 2, 2014

    My daffodils came up this as they have in the past, but only about half of them had flowers. Why did they not bloom?

  4. Marlaen Fisher - May 2, 2014

    My tulips and daffodils bloom at first and then I just get leaves.
    I have dug them up and planted them in different areas.
    I also fertilize them but nothing seems to work.
    What would you suggest.
    Marlaen

  5. Jeanie Riggio - May 2, 2014

    What home made remedy can I use to keep rabbits from eating my lilies? They particularly like the Asiatic Lilies and Tiger Lilies?

  6. Kim Bartlett - May 2, 2014

    Last year we killed all the grass in our new plot, so it was easy to sow the wildflower seeds in the newly-tilled ground. This year we have flowers, weeds, and grass all coming up together. Do I just let everything grow and hope that the grass and weeds aren’t more vigorous than the flowers?

  7. Mike Lizotte - May 4, 2014

    Hello Kim,

    Yes I would recommend being patience and see what develops this spring. If you can positively identify weeds and grasses that have grown in, you could pull those and add more seeds in the coming weeks.
    Thanks!
    The Seed Man

  8. Mike Lizotte - May 4, 2014

    Hello Beth,

    It’s not unusual that daffodils can fade over time for a number of different reasons. Ideally I’d recommend feeding them low nitrogen, high potash fertilizer. Also make sure you don’t cut them back too soon. You want to make sure after the blooms have faded you keep the greenery for an additional few weeks as the greens are feeding the bulb below.

    I hope these tips help!

    Mike

  9. Mike Lizotte - May 4, 2014

    Hello Jeanie,

    I’ve heard a few tricks that might work. Sprinkling black pepper, cayenne pepper, hair clippings (both human/dog), garlic powder and cat litter are all things our customers have had luck with keeping rabbits away. Hopefully one might work for you too!

    Thanks!

    Mike

  10. Mike Lizotte - May 4, 2014

    Hello Andrea,

    I’m sorry to about the troubles you’re having with your ranunculus. When trying to grow were you having any luck at all with getting root growth? They are a ‘tender’ bulb so they do like it warm. Please e-mail me direct: mike@americanmeadows.com and tell me more about your plantings as I might be able to give you more planting suggestions.

    Thanks!

    Mike